Da Vinci the Genius: An Exhibit at The Mind Museum, Bonifacio Global City

da vinci exhibit

Da Vinci the Genius

I had the chance to check out Da Vinci the Genius exhibit at the Mind Museum last weekend. It was already the touring exhibit’s last day in the Philippines, and I was contemplating really hard on whether I should save my pass for another day or grab the chance to see what is deemed as “The most comprehensive exhibit on the life and works of Leonardo Da Vinci.” I obviously was unable to stop myself from using it another day, and went for the latter.

da vinci exhibit

da vinci exhibit

The geek in me was brimming with excitement. Why wouldn’t I, when I’m getting a chance to understand how this great genius’ mind worked well ahead of his time?

da vinci exhibit

Quotes from Leonardo Da Vinci

da vinci exhibit

Da Vinci: “There are three classes of people. Those who see. Whose who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.”

da vinci exhibit

Leonardo Da Vinci (or Leonardo of Vinci) was born in April 15, 1452, in the town of Vinci in Tuscany. It was in Tuscany that the birth of the Italian Renaissance began, and it began years before Da Vinci was born. It is in the unfortunate circumstance of Da Vinci’s life that he was born as an illegitimate child of a 25 year old notary and a young peasant woman. Because he was illegitimate, he was unable to enjoy the privilege of studying and becoming a doctor, a profession which he dreamed of becoming as a child.

da vinci exhibit

The Trojan Horse of Da Vinci. A mechanism which soldiers can use to sneak up on tall fortresses and attack the walled enemy

da vinci exhibit

A Scitian Wagon. Four large scythes attached to a horse-drawn war chariot, intended to cut the legs of the enemies on its path

 

da vinci exhibit

(L) Wings patterned to the wings of a bat. (R) An aerial screw, which is believed to be the ancestor of the helicopter.

da vinci exhibit

Da Vinci’s design of a parachute centuries before the first modern parachute would be tested in the 18th century. (R) What appears to be a glider of sorts.

 

da vinci exhibit

A projector. Working for the Duke of Milan, Ludovico Sforza, required Da Vinci to try his hand at theatrics. He used this projector in projecting shapes and images on walls

da vinci exhibit

Leonardo’s robot design, centuries before the first robot came to be; (R) Da Vinci’s model that resembles a wind vane, to point the direction of the wind

 

da vinci exhibit

The forerunner of the machine gun; With three racks on a revolving frame of 10 cannons each, that’s 30 barrels of ammunition perfect for war

da vinci inventions exhibit

Leonardo’s sketches of the tank and the scitian wagon

Da Vinci had a number of machines and mechanisms designed for war. Despite this, he has wrote down on his notes countless of times how he detests killing and war.

da vinci inventions exhibit

Da Vinci’s notes, called Codices

 

da vinci inventions exhibit

Leonardo’s Alphabet

Da Vinci had a weird way of writing down things. He would write starting from the bottom right hand of the page, with a style referred to as “mirror image writing.” It is believed that Leonardo resorted to this style of writing to protect his ideas, much like a patent.

Da Vinci also extensively studied the human anatomy. He would dissect cadavers and study and draw them in detail, despite dissection being unacceptable and illegal at that time. He was also one of the first people to discover that the hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, could lead to stroke or a heart attack. His detailed sketches have inspired the illustrations in Gray’s Anatomy, an anatomy book widely used by medical students all over the world.

da vinci inventions exhibit

Famous for his painting Mona Lisa, it is believed that the painting was far more important to Da Vinci than just a commissioned work. He brought it everywhere he went. He died in France, and the painting was sold to King Francois I for 4000 ecus.

Even though Mona Lisa is regarded as the most recognized and popular painting in the world, it was an unfinished masterpiece. According to Da Vinci, “Art is never finished, only abandoned.” It is also important to note that the entire sky in the painting was made of a precious stone called lapis lazuli.

The Last Supper is also a very important work of Da Vinci. He was commissioned by the Duke of Milan to pain it on one of the walls of a convent. While the scene of the Last Supper has been painted time and again, Leonardo’s take on the religious event was different. Leonardo’s painting depicted a scene moments after Christ’s announcement that one of his disciples will betray him. It was a challenge to capture the emotion and the facial reactions of the disciples, even for Da Vinci. It took him two to three years to finish the painting.

What I learned about Da Vinci, more than anything, was that he was not considered a genius simply because he was bright, but because he had a deep sense of curiosity for many things. He wanted to know everything, and sought to improve systems, mechanisms, and exiting inventions. He was a visionary as he saw inventions centuries before his time. He was always in a mission to do things better, even with his painting techniques. And something I picked up from Da Vinci: have a list of things to do everyday. Have a sense of purpose.

da vinci inventions exhibit

In the picture above, it says: “Towards the end of his life, he is alleged to have written, “I have offended God and mankind because my work didn’t reach the quality it should have.” Despite all his accomplishments and his contribution to what the world knows today, this is how he felt. It’s very humbling to know that such a great man thinks and feels this way at his deathbed. This is something we should all strive for in life — not to be a genius like Da Vinci, but to leave our greatest life’s work that we can be proud of. -HANA

2 comments to Da Vinci the Genius: An Exhibit at The Mind Museum, Bonifacio Global City

  • Rhea Bue  says:

    OMG! This place is cool!! I wanna check them out soon.. :D buti nalang at malapit lang ako sa BGC <3

    • dollhana  says:

      Hi Rhea! Yeah, the Mind Museum is awesome. Unfortunately, they don’t have the Da Vinci exhibit anymore, since it’s a traveling exhibit. The last day of the exhibit was last November 30. Hopefully the exhibit will return sometime next year. :) They have other cool stuff, though. Hope you check it out, since you’re near lang naman. :)

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